It is Very Important To Omit Words That Aren’t Needed But Sometimes It Can Be Hard To Do When You Are Not Taking Care With Your Writing Or Are Not Revising It

It sure is easier to add needless words than remove them!

55 words, GO!

Hers was not the only heart broken today. A scorned betrayer, she flees the mocking crowd who once were neighbors. The exhilaration of a dark moment is illuminated at dawn. Sowers sow, and she falls to the reaping. Morning light shames her face. “Neither do I condemn you.” And his heart breaks too.

Forcible writing is a muscle that must be flexed. Sometimes I wish I didn’t Facebook so much. Remember when there used to be a character limit? It would scream “Don’t bother! No one will read this!” and when I read it I would prune, prune away, barely realizing I’m practicing a writer’s least favorite (but among his most important) exercise. When artificial limits aren’t imposed, words like weeds will bloat and multiply unchecked.  Considering it took me an hour to yield yield these 54 words (less than 1 word per minute!) I think that it’s high time I rebuild my brevity muscle.

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3 thoughts on “It is Very Important To Omit Words That Aren’t Needed But Sometimes It Can Be Hard To Do When You Are Not Taking Care With Your Writing Or Are Not Revising It

  1. Interesting catch on the Facebook link — I hadn’t considered it before, but yeah. That character limit made me redo more than a few posts.

    I like your story — though, as I noted in a PM, if you don’t know the source material it’s a little difficult to suss out. Maybe put another hint to the source of the story in a title?

    It reminds me of Grant Morrison’s origin of Superman in All-Star Superman #1. DC Comics had just published an origin of Superman that ran for 12 entire issues — so hundreds of pages. He wanted to see how short he could make the origin.

    Morrison got it down to eight words.

    Of course, those eight words were nearly useless if you didn’t already know the story at least in part, but it was pure genius how he pulled it off. Here’s the page if you’re interested in seeing how he boiled the origin of Superman down to eight words: http://sequart.org/images/Morrison-Krypton.jpeg

  2. Hers was not the only heart broken today. A scorned betrayer, she flees the stones of a mocking crowd, once her neighbors. The exhilaration of a dark moment is illuminated at dawn. Sowers sow, and she falls to the reaping. Morning light shames her face. “Neither do I condemn you.” And his heart breaks too.

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